Attorneys

Ran dolph Barnhouse

Randolph (Dolph) Barnhouse is an AV rated lawyer and Certified Appellate Specialist who has argued cases before the United States Supreme Court, the Navajo Nation Supreme Court, the New Mexico Supreme Court, and the Second, Fifth, Seventh and Ninth US Courts of Appeals. Dolph is also admitted to practice in the Western District of Washington. He holds both a JD (cum laude) and an MBA (summa cum laude) from the University of New Mexico. He has counseled Native boards and Tribal clients employing as many as 1,000 people in connection with special prosecutor investigations, board ethics issues, and federal grant and financial compliance issues.

Before joining Johnson Barnhouse & Keegan, Dolph was executive director of DNA-People’s Legal Services, serving members of seven tribes in three states. Dolph has served as Chair of the NNBA Judicial Evaluation Committee, as legal counsel for the NNBA Disciplinary Committee, and has served on the New Mexico Board of Bar Commissioners. Dolph is a recipient of the State Bar of New Mexico’s Courageous Advocacy Award and the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government’s Dixon award for his appellate work on public records issues. Dolph’s practice emphasizes appellate advocacy, complex litigation, gaming, government relations and business matters.

Kelli Keegan

Kelli Keegan holds a JD degree and a Certificate in Indian Law from the University of New Mexico School of Law and an Interdisciplinary Sciences degree from the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology. Kelli is a member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe. Her practice is focused on civil litigation and appeals, Native American gaming, tax law in Indian Country, commercial transactions and general civil law. She is licensed in the Pueblo of Santa Ana, the Navajo Nation courts; Colorado, New Mexico and South Dakota state courts; the District of New Mexico and Western District of Texas federal courts; and the U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit and U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

Before joining the firm, Kelli worked as a contract Special Prosecutor for the Pueblo of Laguna. While in law school, she was awarded Clinical Honors for her work in the Southwest Indian Law Clinic, where she represented Native clients in state court and served in the public defender project with the Pueblo of Laguna Court. She also received the Advocacy Award from the American Indian Law Center’s Pre-Law Summer Institute.

Justin Solimon

Justin Solimon holds a JD degree and a Certificate in Indian Law from the University of New Mexico School of Law, and a BA in Diplomacy and World Affairs from Occidental College. Before joining the firm, he represented American Indian tribes and tribally owned entities in litigation and transactional matters; he was an Adjunct Professor at the University of New Mexico School of Law where he taught Economic Development in Indian Country; and most recently he represented individuals and entities located in New Mexico on a variety of matters, including premises liability, personal injury, construction defect, construction law and business litigation.

While in law school, Justin received the Dean’s Award for Significant Contribution to the Law School Community, he was Managing Editor of the Tribal Law Journal, and he participated in the Southwest Indian Law Clinic. Justin is a member of the Pueblo of Laguna.

Christina West

Christina West is an AV rated lawyer who has practiced law for more than fifteen years. She holds both a JD degree and a Certificate in Indian Law from Arizona State University School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Tulsa. Christina’s work has been recognized through her receipt of a number of prestigious awards including Benchmarks’ 2012 Top 250 Female Litigators in America, Super Lawyers’ Rising Star award, Chambers’ Native American Law award and Future Star award. Christina has represented tribal clients in a wide range of federal Indian law matters, including constitutional law, tribal governance, contract law, development projects, and liability defense as well as construction and employment transactional and litigation matters.

She is licensed in the Pueblos of Laguna, Tesuque, San Juan/ Ohkay Owingeh, Isleta, Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, Hopi Tribe, Navajo Nation; New Mexico state court; the U.S. District Court for the District of New Mexico and the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. Christina is on the board of directors for the New Mexico Women’s Bar Association and is Vice President/President-Elect of DVRC, Inc, who fights domestic violence. She is also an Associate Member of the Tribal In-House Counsel Association. Christina is of Southern Cheyenne descent.

Karl Johnson

Karl Johnson is the managing partner of Johnson Barnhouse & Keegan. Karl is an AV rated lawyer who has taught and practiced federal Indian law and commercial law for more than 30 years. His current practice is focused on tribal economic development, environmental protection, and Indian land and water rights. He has represented tribal clients in major fee-to-trust conversions, gaming and hospitality developments, land acquisition, and Indian water rights settlements.

Karl began his legal career with DNA-People’s Legal Services on the Navajo Reservation and then joined the faculty of the University of New Mexico School of Law to teach federal Indian law, commercial transactions and business associations. Karl holds an undergraduate degree in philosophy from the University of Oklahoma and a JD from the University of Oregon School of Law, where he graduated Order of the Coif and first in his class. He is past chair of the Indian Law Section of the State Bar of New Mexico and has received the Albuquerque Bar Association’s annual award as the city’s outstanding attorney.

Veronique Richardson

Veronique Richardson holds a JD degree and Certificate in Indian Law from the University of New Mexico School of Law and a BA in Ethnic Studies and Native American Studies from the University of California at Berkeley. Veronique is a member of the Pueblo of Laguna. Before joining the firm, she was a staff attorney at New Mexico Legal Aid, Inc., Native American Program where she provided legal services and representation for low income New Mexicans and Native Americans regarding federal Indian law and tribal law matters.

While in law school, Veronique was involved in the Native American Law Student Association, the Indian Law Section of the State Bar and Tribal Law Journal, serving as a member and editor. Veronique is currently on the Indian Law Section Board and is the Indian Law Section Liaison for the Young Lawyers division. As part of Veronique’s legal career she has been and continues to remain committed to serving the larger Native community as well as her community at the Pueblo of Laguna.

Michelle Miano

Michelle Miano holds a JD degree from the University of New Mexico School of Law and a BA in the Writing Seminars from Johns Hopkins University. Before joining the firm, Michelle was associate counsel at the New Mexico State Land Office, where she worked on legal matters involving commercial leases, oil and gas operations and trespass issues, as well as the completion of a historic land exchange with the Pueblo de Cochiti. Michelle is committed to serving native people and advancing tribal rights, and is honored to be sharing this passion through her work at the firm. While in law school, Michelle was a recipient of the Albert E. Utton Natural Resources Law Award and James E. Sperling Memorial Scholarship Award, co-president of the Environmental Law Society, and spent a semester in Washington, DC as a law clerk for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. She has served on the State Bar of New Mexico Natural Resources, Energy and Environmental Law Section as Secretary and Young Lawyers Division Liaison, and currently serves on the Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Air Quality Control Board.t

Dianna Kicking Woman

Dianna Kicking Woman holds a JD degree and Certificate in Indian Law from the University of New Mexico School of Law. She also holds a BS in Anthropology from the University of Oregon (McNair Scholar with departmental honors) and a MA in Anthropology from the University of New Mexico (Hibben Fellow). Before law school, she was a researcher at the Southwest Tribal Native American Research Centers for Health and served on the New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange Board. While in law school, Dianna was vice president of the Native American Law Students Association, participated in the Southwest Indian Law Clinic, and was a member and editor of the Tribal Law Journal. Dianna also worked for the Utton Transboundary Resources Center while in school, co-authoring “A Comparative Analysis of State Water Planning Efforts in Arizona, Colorado, Montana, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas & Utah with Commentary on New Mexico Water Planning Statutes, Objectives, and Tribal Consultation” for the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission. Dianna is Blackfeet and Choctaw and is committed to serving the national Native community as well as her communities at the Blackfeet Nation and Choctaw Nation.dkickingwoman@localhost